A better morning

by | Oct 23, 2020 | Mental Health Minute

We’ve reached the time of year when the days are shorter and morning light doesn’t coincide with the sound of the alarm clock. Combine the darkness with the difficulties of this year and morning motivation may be low. You are definitely not the only one struggling with the morning routine.

Yet mornings are still an important time of the day. How we start the day can determine how the day will go. Your first actions—even before getting out of bed—can help set the tone for your emotional, physical and spiritual well-being. For your consideration, here are “Five Ways to Have a Renewed Mindset Each Morning.”

“In the midst of the trials, I still dare to hope that there is goodness and beauty offered to me each morning. The morning brings a new start. It is a refresh button that allows reflection on God’s goodness. If mornings truly are a time to reflect and look forward, how then are we starting these sacred moments?”

Read the full article.

If the cold season really has you feeling stuck in the morning and hitting the snooze button more than you’d like, here are a few more tips to try including having something to look forward to.

“It’s much easier to get out of bed when you focus on something you actually want to do instead of on the drudgery of what you must do. Try setting aside a few minutes in the morning for a ritual that will help you look forward to waking up.”

Read the full article.

Being intentional in the morning (or even in your bedtime routine) can give you motivation for better choices throughout your day. Try adding one action step at a time and watch your perspective change.

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