How are you feeling?

by | Dec 21, 2020 | Communications, COVID-19 Resources, Mental Health Minute

This year has come with a host of feelings and emotions. There are larger challenges happening in our country and around the world. And there are personal and relational struggles that feel equally overwhelming at times. We’ve been pushed and stretched often beyond what we thought we could handle.

Let’s take a moment and check in.

How are you feeling today?

How are you responding to those feelings?

Encompass Therapist Glenn Sprunger reminds us that, “Feelings are a gift from God. Each one of them needs to breathe and find meaningful expressions. Some of our emotions are intense and compel us to take action. Some of our emotions are right on the surface, and they easily flow through our expressions and conversations. Other feelings get buried deep below the surface, and they’re connected with our family and relational history.”

Read the full article.

It’s okay to not be okay. It’s okay to have a variety of emotions in the same day or the same hour. You may not be enthusiastic about each minute and each task set before us. You can experience peace in the chaos and disruption. You can know joy in the grief and sorrow. It starts with reflection.

“God cares about each of our emotions and what we do with them. The more we turn to God with the vast array of emotions that we daily encounter, the more deeply we can feel and experience His loving presence.” -Glenn Sprunger, LSW

It’s also okay to ask for help. We weren’t created to do life alone. Talking with a therapist could be your next right step for this season. To help you reflect and process your emotions. To find new strategies and coping skills. To renew your hope. Our clinicians are available with in-person or virtual sessions. Learn more about our counseling services or request an appointment.

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